Tomorrow When The War Began is on Netflix, by the way! (I don't know if you have Netflix in Australia but... Well, it may help gain American fans. That's how I found out about it!)

Yeah! :) I think a lot of people found out about it this way, too.


I've read that one of the reasons the "movie didn't get as popular as predicted" was because of the "poor acting." I though the acting wasn't the greatest, but I didn't find it poor. But I realize that I'm American, and we have different accents and cultures, so there would be a difference in acting for Americans and Australians, so there is only so much of an opinion I could have on the acting. I was wondering how you felt about the acting.

salainen:

tomorrow-series-eu:

It’s difficult to pick the one element that makes a film either successful or a flop. I agree with you a lot that opinions on acting vary from person to person: you might find that something great about this actor’s performance, I might not find it as convincing. I thought that the acting in TWTWB varied from average to good. They definitely worked as an ensemble cast, because the actors had a nice chemistry that translated beautifully on screen. I think some of the acting felt strained at times because the script was very fast-paced, and this had a negative (albeit positive in terms of entertainment) effect on what should have been natural character’s development. Had the film been a TV series, based on few book chapters per each episode, I think the entire story would have benefited and so would the acting. In my opinion, there were three stands out: Caitlin Stasey (Ellie), Deniz Akdeniz (Homer) and Ashleigh Cummings (Robyn). I believe Caitlin did a great job with Ellie. She obviously doesn’t look like the Ellie we expected from the novels, but her emotions were well portrayed on screen. I especially liked Caitlin’s acting in the scene where she screams at Chris. Deniz, instead, resembled physically the role he got casted for and he was convincing enough with his portrayal of Homer, from a trouble-maker teenager to a self-appointed leader of the group (along with Ellie). Ashleigh was very good, too. Her character Robyn wasn’t as faithful to the book, for the simple reason that she became more of a caricature (still, not as much as Chris) and while script-wise she lacked of dimensionality, I loved how Ashleigh portrayed her innocence, and the scene where she kills the soldiers was by far one of my favorite scenes of the film, even if it wasn’t from the book.
I really want to hope that the film’s Australian-ness wasn’t what made it flop internationally. I think people just weren’t familiar with the story (the books are still very successul in Australia and NZ) or that the film was coming out, because the distribution and promotion were poorly handled. It’s a story that holds an universal appeal, and I’d like to think it could’ve performed well, if only better promoted. In Australia and NZ, the movie did great at the box office - fairly high numbers for an Australian-produced film - and I remember the director and actors mentioning during the promotional tour that basing on that response, they would’ve 100% done a sequel. I guess they were expecting the same sort of success overseas, but it didn’t happen.

I always think that the strong Australian themes would put off international audiences, particularly with the books. I don’t know how popular they did overseas, but there are so many purely Australian themes in the Tomorrow series and the Ellie Chronicles (Cottees song, for instance).

I think the series would do very well as a TV show, personally! I think each book has enough substance to be one season, with the ability to do a sequel spin off for the Ellie Chronicles (unlikely to be popular, but I enjoyed it because Gavin).

I dunno, maybe teens today just don’t like the books anymore? I want a tv series, god fucking damnit.

Oh, that’s a shame. I’m not Australian, I’m European (as suggested by both the website and blog’s url :) ) but it was the Australian setting that drew me first into the series. I was fascinated by Australian culture, traditions and such, a multitude of things put into a universally relatable context. It’s a country we rarely see depicted in media, and I believe it’s a fantastic setting for these books. I particularly like that it took place in the outback, as it gave the story more mystery and that is always a source of charm. Without the Australian setting and the strong ‘aussie’ feel that comes through it, I don’t think the books would have been the same. Ellie herself explained very well that she’s a proud farmer and Australia more than an actual setting was another character part of the books. John Marsden described it to details, but not in a way that was boring. It’s possible that overseas fans don’t always understand every reference, but that is what research is for, plus as far as the aussie slang goes, there’s a glossary at the end of each book in every European edition (which made it even easier for me because English is not my native language). I hope that other people appreciated the Australian themes anyway, even if they don’t relate to all of their traditions.

I agree completely that at this point of the time the story would make a great TV series. Budget isn’t the biggest problem anymore, there are some beautifully-done TV shows that rival feature films in terms of cinematography. I always loved the idea of a movie saga because the books have some perfect cinematic elements, but the most important part of the series (the characters and how they interact with each other) would benefit a lesser big scale, very down-to-earth feel and this is better suited for the episodic format. If they’ll ever bother to reboot it in the future, a TV series is the best option and probably the most likely to take in consideration.
The Ellie Chronicles is a different story, too. Another reason why the TV series format is better for the story is that from the 4th book on, Darkness Be My Friend, the series gets slow-paced in favor of character drama, something that is impossible to translate on theatre’s screens properly unless they’d decide to either produce a endless film, or sacrifice vital scenes for the sake of action.

I’m sure that there are a lot of people out there who still love the books. The ‘survival’ theme is one that draws crowd even as of today. I think that the film was cursed from the start because of the lack of promotion. There are so many films that come out nowadays, but we all don’t give enough chance to something we haven’t heard enough of (hence why most movies are either remakes or reprise similar themes to successful series). I’d like to think that with better promotion, we would have seen more of Ellie and her friends on screen. I can tell you that in my country it was barely advertised. There was just a short promo that aired on a not-very-popular network and that was it. They re-printed the first book (just the first one, the rest was never released, not even back in the 90s) and advertised it on the cover as the Australian ‘Twilight’…um, okaaay? As far as I know, the same happened in the rest of Europe. Had the movie adaptation came out at the time the series first got published, the series of films would have been completed. But nowadays a poorly advertised film (outside Australia and NZ) is doomed to death.


I've read that one of the reasons the "movie didn't get as popular as predicted" was because of the "poor acting." I though the acting wasn't the greatest, but I didn't find it poor. But I realize that I'm American, and we have different accents and cultures, so there would be a difference in acting for Americans and Australians, so there is only so much of an opinion I could have on the acting. I was wondering how you felt about the acting.

It’s difficult to pick the one element that makes a film either successful or a flop. I agree with you a lot that opinions on acting vary from person to person: you might find that something great about this actor’s performance, I might not find it as convincing. I thought that the acting in TWTWB varied from average to good. They definitely worked as an ensemble cast, because the actors had a nice chemistry that translated beautifully on screen. I think some of the acting felt strained at times because the script was very fast-paced, and this had a negative (albeit positive in terms of entertainment) effect on what should have been natural character’s development. Had the film been a TV series, based on few book chapters per each episode, I think the entire story would have benefited and so would the acting. In my opinion, there were three stands out: Caitlin Stasey (Ellie), Deniz Akdeniz (Homer) and Ashleigh Cummings (Robyn). I believe Caitlin did a great job with Ellie. She obviously doesn’t look like the Ellie we expected from the novels, but her emotions were well portrayed on screen. I especially liked Caitlin’s acting in the scene where she screams at Chris. Deniz, instead, resembled physically the role he got casted for and he was convincing enough with his portrayal of Homer, from a trouble-maker teenager to a self-appointed leader of the group (along with Ellie). Ashleigh was very good, too. Her character Robyn wasn’t as faithful to the book, for the simple reason that she became more of a caricature (still, not as much as Chris) and while script-wise she lacked of dimensionality, I loved how Ashleigh portrayed her innocence, and the scene where she kills the soldiers was by far one of my favorite scenes of the film, even if it wasn’t from the book.
I really want to hope that the film’s Australian-ness wasn’t what made it flop internationally. I think people just weren’t familiar with the story (the books are still very successul in Australia and NZ) or that the film was coming out, because the distribution and promotion were poorly handled. It’s a story that holds an universal appeal, and I’d like to think it could’ve performed well, if only better promoted. In Australia and NZ, the movie did great at the box office - fairly high numbers for an Australian-produced film - and I remember the director and actors mentioning during the promotional tour that basing on that response, they would’ve 100% done a sequel. I guess they were expecting the same sort of success overseas, but it didn’t happen.


Is it true that a sequel (movie-wise) is on it's way for 2014?

I hate to say it, but sadly this is not true. There’s just no sequel planned at all. The movie’s production has been discontinued since 2011. There were rumours about the script being completed, but that is not enough to substain the entire creative process. The lead actress, Caitlin Stasey, mentioned recently that she believes the series could be rebooted in the future, but it would surely happen with different cast and a different production team.